Rickard’s Red IPA: Red Dead Redundancy

This American red ale from Molson Coors Canada is a clear amber colour, yielding a large and spongy white head that has good retention, lingering as a rocky cap. Rickard’s Red IPA has a strong, lemony aroma and light peppery tone in front of light toffee malts that carry notes of fresh grain and warm biscuit.

Rickard's Red IPA
No One Asked for This

The taste of Rickard’s Red IPA seems somewhat imbalanced at first, but manages to come together, wavering from a sweet but sharp buckwheat honey-like tone to a punchy citric bite and then warm, syrupy peach and mango flavours. A moderate bitterness (40 IBU) transitions to an earthy and grainy finish and though there are pleasant lemon and fruit notes that linger, they are saddled with an unfortunate stickiness that had me reaching for my water glass between sips of this full-bodied ale.

Bud Light Apple: Rotten to the Core

The latest flavoured light lager from Anheuser-Busch InBev is light golden yellow in colour and yields a creamy white head that is retained as a persistent cap. Bud Light Apple smells like candy and the kind of grocery store apple juice that people don’t let their kids drink. While this may appeal to some, there is also a thoroughly unpleasant chemical odour that reminds me of artificial sweeteners.

Bud Light Apple
Even Over Ice, This Beer Sucks

I find Bud Light Apple cloyingly sweet. Its malic acid-assisted green apple candy flavour is countered by a sharp citric acid tartness. There is a very light note of caramel malt in there, but the finish is dirty and overly dry tasting and I just can’t shake the chemical notes. This beer is thin bodied and has ample carbonation, which makes its general stickiness feel heightened.

Mad & Noisy Hop & Weizen: Dry & Fruity

Mad & Noisy Hop & Weizen from Creemore Springs Brewery Limited in Creemore, Ontario is cloudy, light chartreuse in colour and pours with a large and creamy white head that settles into a rocky cap and yields some chunky lacing. This hopped up take on german wheat beer has a fairly light and airy smell. Traditional aromas of banana, clove and bubblegum are found, but are muted somewhat by notes of lemongrass and grapefruit pith.

Mad & Noisy Hop & Weizen
Try This Wheat Ale with Fresh Summer Fruit

The taste of Mad & Noisy Hop & Weizen is quite crisp, with its slight bitterness front-loaded. There is plenty of grapefruit flavour, along with toasted wheat, light berry notes and a hint of clove in the starkly dry finish and aftertaste. The ale is medium-bodied and has a moderate amount of carbonation, as well and a rather lively mouthfeel.

Alexander Keith’s Saphir Hop Ale: A Stone’s Throw

Designed to showcase a German hop variety, Alexander Keith’s Saphir Hop Ale from Anheuser-Busch InBev pours a light amber colour with a creamy off-white head that dissipates quickly, leaving behind nothing but a thread-like collar. This American pale ale has aromas of black tea, bergamot, lemon zest, black pepper and dark honey, with hints of wet grass, perfume and red grape skins.

Alexander Keith's Saphir Hop Ale
This Ale is All Over the Place

The taste of Alexander Keith’s Saphir Hop Ale starts with a sharp honey sweetness then quickly becomes very dry, with a bitter citrus peel flavour apparent throughout that becomes quite pronounced in the finish and aftertaste. Subtle notes of toasted caramel malt and strawberry can be detected as well. This ale is grainy, earthy, mildly viscose, scantily carbonated and leaves my mouth feeling rather dry in between sips.

Alpine Lager: Keep Climbing

This American pale lager from Moosehead Breweries Limited in Saint John, New Brunswick is a light golden yellow colour and yields a loose white head that quickly settles into a thin cap, while plenty of carbonation is visible within the beer itself. Alpine Lager has a floral, perfume-like smell with notes of light malt, rice and minerals.

Alpine Lager
An East Coast Favourite has Returned to Ontario

The taste of Alpine Lager is anchored by sweet, Vienna-style malt and fresh grain notes. Grassy hops bring a surprisingly sturdy bitterness that transitions to a noticeably metallic finish, though the aftertaste is remarkably clean and crisp aside from the slightest hint of diacetyl. The lager has a fairly thin, mildly grainy body with no real viscosity to speak of.