Rickard’s Lederhosen: Big For Its Breeches

Rickard’s Lederhosen from Molson Coors Canada pours a clear, bright amber colour with a creamy off-white head that burns off quickly, leaving a thin moldy-looking film behind. This märzen smells mainly of roasted caramel malts, with notes of wild grasses, floral noble hops, sourdough bread and honey.

Rickard's Lederhosen
This Bitter Märzen Will Warm You Up on a Cool Fall Day

The taste of Rickard’s Lederhosen is quite hoppy for a märzen. The style’s traditional sweetness is muffled by a citrus tinged bitterness. That said, even though it’s not to style, the lager is well-balanced in general. It has a crisp, metallic and slightly tart finish, while the aftertaste of this medium-bodied and mildly viscose brew has a grainy flavour and noticeable ethanol hook.

Let the Gruit Times Roll: Let Them Be on Your Side

Let the Gruit Times Roll from Railway City Brewing Company in St. Thomas, Ontario pours a clear golden-amber colour with a fairly small but creamy white head that gets retained as a soapy film and small collar. The smell of rosemary pops from this spiced, un-hopped ale against a backdrop of sweet malts that carries notes of honey and caramel.

Let the Gruit Times Roll
Variety is the Spice of Life

The blend of rosemary, sage and black cumin dominates the taste of Let the Gruit Times Roll. The brew is particularly dry and peppery at first and in the finish, while a light and syrupy sweetness comes through on the tongue to lighten things up. The mouthfeel is on the thick and viscous side and carbonation is minimal. The sage and black cumin notes hang around in the aftertaste.

Butler’s Bitter: You Rang, Sir?

Butler’s Bitter from Niagara College Teaching Brewery in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario has a deep amber hue with honey highlights and a moderately-sized and frothy tan head that gets retained as a small collar and spotty film. A rocky, somewhat mossy mineral-heavy aroma is prevalent in this English bitter and backed up by bready, syrupy malts that evoke molasses and accented by a note of lemon juice.

Butler's Bitter
I’m Always Happy to See English Milds and Bitters on Ontario Shelves

The taste of Butler’s Bitter is also syrupy and rather sweet at first, here taking on a dark toffee character. Accents of cashew and coffee lead to a bitter finish with notes of lemon, black tea and mineral water and an aftertaste that carries a mild, berry-like fruitiness. This ale is full-bodied with mild carbonation and is heavy with malt and earth on the tongue.

Kichesippi Logger: Pleases Girls (and Boys) Completely

A rarely-brewed style of American Porter that originated in Pennsylvania in the early 1900s, Kichesippi Logger from Kichesippi Beer Company in Ottawa, Ontario pours a nut brown and ruby colour with a frothy beige head that persists as a thin collar and leaves some heavy lace behind. Kichesippi Logger has a woody and nutty smell, with a solid whiff of lager yeast, dark fruit and cocoa accents and a light toastiness about it.

Kichesippi Logger
This Beer Combines the Heartiness of a Porter with the Crispness of a Lager

The taste of Kichesippi Logger really shows its lagered roots with a crisp bite. Ripe fruit, chocolate and wood flavours are present and a fairly strong bitterness is found in the finish. The mouthfeel is typically thin and yeast creates a tangy sensation on the tongue. The aftertaste is mildly syrupy with lingering fruit and chocolate notes.

Highlander Scottish Ale: Love is for Poets

This Scottish ale from the Highlander Brew Company in South River, Ontario pours a fiery amber-ruby colour with a frothy light beige head that leaves a collar that sticks to your pint glass on its way down, giving off a cocoon-like lace effect. Highlander Scottish Ale smells mostly of caramel malts and mineral water, with bread crust and freshly cut grains as accents.

Highlander Scottish Ale
Highlander Scottish Ale is Smooth but Complex

Highlander Scottish Ale tastes like tart, sour grains that have been toasted and sweetened with caramel or honey. Wood, light chocolate, cherry and cigar smoke can also be detected. The ale has a toasty, creamy and bready mouthfeel with a low amount of carbonation. It is syrupy and oily on the tongue in the finish, with a muffin-like aftertaste that has a hint of flowers.